News (page 1 of 6)

The News section gathers announcements and current events relevant to anthropology and its history. To submit such news, please email us at news@histanthro.org.

Funding Opportunity: 2020 Indigenous Community Research Fellowships at the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum

The American Philosophical Society Library & Museum in Philadelphia, PA invites applications for its 2020 Indigenous Community Research Fellowships. These fellowships support research by Indigenous community members, elders, teachers, knowledge keepers, tribal officials, traditional leaders, museum and archive professionals, scholars, and others, regardless of academic background, seeking to examine materials at the APS Library & Museum in support of Indigenous community-based priorities. More information about this opportunity can be found below.

Continue reading

New Resource: Wendy Wickwire’s At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging

The History of Anthropology Newsletter is pleased to announce the recent publication of Wendy Wickwire‘s new work At the Bridge: James Teit and an Anthropology of Belonging. In this work, Wickwire chronicles the little-known story of James Teit, a prolific ethnographer who, from 1884 to 1922, worked with and advocated for the Indigenous peoples of British Columbia and the northwestern United States. As the first comprehensive and authoritative account of this important ethnographer, At the Bridge serves as a historical corrective, consolidating Teit’s place as a leading and innovative anthropologist and Indigenous rights activist.

A short description of this book can be found below.

Continue reading

HSS History of Anthropology Happy Hour, July 25 2019

In the spirit of the History of Science Society’s Annual Meeting, the History of Anthropology Newsletter will be hosting an informal gathering at Cafe Le Journal in Utrecht on Thursday, July 25th, at 7pm. All are welcome to join editors from the History of Anthropology Newsletter for drinks, snacks, and conversation.

John Tresch, Laurel Waycott, Adam Fulton Johnson, and Cameron Brinitzer will walk to Le Journal from Utrecht University (Drift 25) after the panel “At the Crossroads of the Senses: Human Sciences and Their Material Cultures ca. 1900” (Thursday, July 25, 16:00-18:00). 

History of Anthropology at HSS, Utrecht, the Netherlands, July 23-27, 2019

The annual meeting of the History of Science Society (HSS) will take place July 23-27 in the historic buildings of Utrecht University. Here is a list of sessions and events relevant to the history of anthropology:

July 24, 2019

Gendering Development

Drift 21, Rm 005, 9:00-11:45

Measuring Heads and Races: Continuities and Ruptures in the History of Biometry

Drift 25, Rm 204, 13:30-15:30

Population Variability and Human Types: Exploring the Scientific Uses of Race from the 1940s to the 1990s

Drift 25, Rm 103, 16:00-18:00

July 25, 2019

Pacific Science in Transnational and Translocal Perspective

Drift 25, Rm 206, 9:00-11:45

At the Crossroads of the Senses: Human Sciences and their Material Cultures ca 1900

Drift 25, Rm 105, 16:00-18:00

Cultivating Knowledge

Drift 25, Rm 204, 16:00-18:00

History of Anthropology Happy Hour

Cafe Le Journal, 7pm

July 26, 2019

Un-telling Expeditions

Janskerhof 2-3, Rm. 013, 13:30-15:30

Science in the Nineteenth Century

Drift 25, Rm 206, 13:30-15:30

Science, Universal History, and the Future

Drift 25, Rm 104, 13:30-15:30

July 27, 2019

Anatomical Representation and Bodily Difference in the Long-Nineteenth Century

Drift 25, Rm 105, 9:00-11:45

Histories of Anthropology at the History of Science Society, Seattle, 2018: Conference Report

The 2018 History of Science Society (HSS) conference in Seattle, Washington, was blessed with a rich offering in the history of anthropology, staking the field’s relevance to growing conversations around science in the world, Indigenous knowledges, and comparative cosmology.

For the first time, a formal land acknowledgement was explicitly incorporated into the plenary opening the conference. The settlement now known as Seattle sits on the historical territory of the Duwamish. After an introduction by Eli Nelson (Williams College), member of the Kanien’kehá:ka and historian of Native science, Cecile Hansen, Chairwoman of the Duwamish tribe, rose to the podium. She extended a welcome to members of HSS and detailed the tribe’s history in the area, including its ongoing struggle for federal recognition, and invited the packed audience to visit the Duwamish Longhouse and Cultural Center.

Continue reading

CFP: Die Bilder der Aufklärung / Pictures of Enlightenment / Les Images des Lumières, Annual Conference of the German Society for Eighteenth Century Studies, Halle, Germany, 16-18 September 2020

The German Society for Eighteenth Century Studies (DGEJ) has issued a call for papers for its annual conference Die Bilder der Aufklärung / Pictures of Enlightenment / Les Images des Lumières. Taking place at the Interdisciplinary Centre for Enlightenment Studies, Halle (Saale), Germany from 16-18 September 2020, this trilingual event will explore the relations of and intersections between the Enlightenment and pictorial media. In particular, this event will focus on the role that artistic works, technical drawings, depictions of everyday objects, tables and diagrams and artisanal book illustrations played in shaping past and present concepts of the Enlightenment period.

The conference design proposes a combination of plenary papers and slightly shorter session papers. Conference organizers welcome German, English, or French-language papers and would like to particularly encourage early stage researchers to apply. To submit a paper, please send the title of your proposed presentation together with an abstract (max. 3000 characters incl. spaces) and a bio-bibliographical note to bilder2020@izea.uni-halle.de by 15 August 2019.

See here for the full CFP, written in German, English and French.

2019 Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) Annual Meeting


This week from June 26-29, 2019, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) will convene its annual meeting at the University of Waikato in Aotearoa, New Zealand. Check out this year’s program and catch up on past years’ meetings with these reflections on sessions from 2016, 2017, and 2018. Also, if you are attending NAISA 2019 and would like to share your experiences or reflections on any panel sessions relevant to the history of anthropology, drop us a line!

History of Anthropology at NAISA 2018: Examining “Archival Diasporas”


Native American and Indigenous scholars often consult archival holdings in multiple sites and collections. Archival materials are frequently split, scattered, or dispersed across various repositories, and researchers will have to visit multiple institutions to access the papers and materials of previous anthropologists. For instance, the records and manuscripts of Margaret Mead are kept at the Library of Congress, American Philosophical Society, American Museum of Natural History, and other sites. Thus, scholars have over the years considered archival dispersion as a lens to examine the very nature of archives. What are the challenges and opportunities of studying the stories and contexts of dispersed collections? Continue reading

History of Anthropology at NAISA 2017 in Vancouver, BC


The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association (NAISA) held its annual conference in Vancouver, Canada, on the traditional and unceded lands of the Musqueam Nation.  Hosted by the University of British Columbia (UBC), the conference reflected the vibrant explosion of work in this field, and brought together a group of scholars, artists, activists, and community members from nations across all continents (except Antarctica) for three days of work, play, and celebration. Continue reading

Event: Archives, Collections and Practices of Knowledge-Making: Histories of Anthropology, São Paulo, Brazil, 1-5 July 2019

From July 1-5, 2019, the Cidade Universitária and the Centro de Pesquisa e Formação SESC are hosting a conference entitled: “Practices of Knowledge-Making: Histories of Anthropology.” This event aims to reflect on anthropological archives and collections in order to retrieve histories of anthropology and shed new light on the discipline and its practices and procedures. More detailed information about this conference can be found below.

Continue reading

Call for Nominations: General Anthropology Division Awards

The General Anthropology Division (GAD) of the American Anthropology Association is seeking calls for nominations for three awards: the GAD New Directions Award, the GAD Prize for Exemplary Cross-Field Scholarship, and the CASTAC David Hakken Prize for graduate student papers. These awards will be presented to recipients at the GAD’s annual awards ceremony. More information about these awards, and instructions for submitting a nomination can be found below.

Continue reading

New Resource: Michael C. Carhart’s “Leibniz Discovers Asia: Social Networking in the Republic of Letters”

The History of Anthropology Newsletter (HAN) is happy to announce the publication of Michael C. Carhart’s new work Leibniz Discovers Asia: Social Networking in the Republic of Letters. Part of the Johns Hopkins University Press series “Information Cultures,” which illuminates the material and cultural circumstances that have shaped the production, reading, and public consumption of texts, Carhart’s work traces the history of linguistics through following the work of philosopher, scientist, and mathematician Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, who developed a vast network of scholars and missionaries throughout Europe to acquire the linguistic data he needed.

Dr. Carhart has written a short description of his book, which can be found below:

Continue reading

Histories of Anthropology: Transforming Knowledge and Power, Cambridge, 2017: Conference Report

 

Histories of Anthropology: Transforming Knowledge and Power” was a two-day conference held at Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge, on 18–19 September 2017. Papers ranged widely in geographical scope, in their methodological approach, and in their focus on different anthropological subfields. This report analyses submitted abstracts to give a suggestion about the state of the field and summarizes the contributions of each of the speakers made in their presentations.

Continue reading

Event: Jean Cuisenier (1927-2017): Jalons d’une odyssée en anthropologie de l’Europe, June 21-22, 2019, Paris

On June 21-22, 2019 the Musée du Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac and Bibliothèque Nationale de France François Mitterand is hosting a two-day colloquium in commemoration of Jean Cuisenier, the former director of the Centre d’ethnologie française (1968-1986), conservateur en chef of the Musée National des Arts et Traditions Populaires (1968-1988), and editor of the journal Ethnologie française.

Continue reading

Event: Documentary Screening and Panel Discussion of JUNOD, Lisbon, 19 June 2019

On June 19, 2019 the University of Lisbon’s Institute of Social Sciences is hosting a film screening and panel discussion of the 2006 documentary JUNOD which portrays the life of Henri-Alexandre Junod (1863-1934), a Swiss Protestant missionary, anthropologist, linguist, photographer, entomologist and fiction writer. Filmed in Mozambique and South Africa, countries where Junod lived, this work examines his work and thought by situating the diversity and specificities of his work. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion featuring the film’s director/producer Camilo de Sousa, Matheus Serva Pereira, a historian specializing in Social History of Africa, and Paulo Granjo, an anthropologist whose research focuses on industrial contexts in Portugal and Mozambique. The screening will take place at 5:00pm in the Sedas Nunes Auditorium (ICS -ULisboa).

More information about this event can be found here.

Event: Missionaries as the First Anthropologists? Les missionnaires, premiers anthropologues ? Retours sur une idée reçue. Paris, 14 June 2019

On June 14, 2019 the Study Center In Social Studies Du Religieux is hosting a workshop that examines the roles of missionaries as producers of proto-ethnological-knowledge and the patterns of the relations between the activities of  Catholic or Protestant missionaries and those of ethnologists and anthropologists in the field. Entitled Les missionnaires, premiers anthropologues ? Retours sur une idée reçue (Missionaries as the First Anthropologists?), the event is taking place on salle Alphonse Dupront, 10 rue Monsieur le Prince, Paris from 13.00 h – 19.30 h. More information about the event can be found here.

Event: Repatriation Strikes Back, Le retour de la restitution. Géopolitiques du patrimoine, éthiques du transfert, économies du retour. Sorbonne Université, Paris, 12 June 2019

On June 12, 2019 the Sorbonne will be hosting a workshop entitled “Repatriation Strikes Back,” or Le retour de la restitution. Géopolitiques du patrimoine, éthiques du transfert, économies du retour. This workshop will address the question of restitution of stolen or stolen objects from the point of view of the actors, the public and the countries concerned with their return and reception. Location information and the event’s program can be found below.

Continue reading

Call for Papers: Special Issue in Stedelijk Studies on Imagining the Future of Digital Archives and Collections

Stedelijk Studies has issued a CFP for a special issue on Imagining the Future of Digital Archives and Collections. More information about this opportunity can be found below:

Continue reading

CFP: Encounters and Exchanges: Exploring the history of science, technology, medicine, and mātauranga (indigenous knowledge), December 1-3, 2019, Blenheim, New Zealand.

The University of Otago and the Tōtaranui 250 Trust has issued a call for papers for Encounters and Exchanges: Exploring the History of Science, Technology and Mātauranga (Indigenous Knowledge). Taking place from December 1-3, 2019 in Blenheim, New Zealand, this conference is part of a sequence of national events in New Zealand titled Tuia – Encounters 250 Commemoration. These mark the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s first Pacific voyage and the first onshore meetings between Europeans and the indigenous people of New Zealand, the Māori. The conference is interested in analysing the implications of this event on the global history of science, technology, medicine, and indigenous knowledge. More information about this event and the submission process can be found below.

Continue reading

Call for Applications: Geographies of Cultural Memory, A One-Day Workshop with Carlo Severi, June 8, 2019, The Warburg Institute, University of London

The Warburg Institute is pleased to announce a day-long workshop with renowned anthropologist Carlo Severi (Ecole de Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, LAS/Collège de France). Professor Severi will give a public lecture at the Warburg at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, June 7th. The next day, Saturday, June 8th from 11:00 to 17:00, he will lead a closed-session workshop. We invite PhD students, post-docs, and early career scholars to participate.

Entitled “Geographies of Cultural Memory,” the workshop will address methodological and historical problems in the study of global visual and aesthetic traditions. Drawing upon Severi’s foundational work on cultural memory and indigenous arts, discussions will place particular emphasis on the role of images and visual arts within anthropology and ethnography. How has anthropology dealt with the formal variety and geographical diffusion of aesthetic objects in the past, and what new modes of investigation offer themselves to us today? In this connection, we will also have occasion to revisit long-dormant anthropological aspects of Aby Warburg’s cultural science, and to consider its ramifications for a global study of culture in both the past and the present. 

Under Severi’s direction, the workshop will consist of group discussions of key texts and a limited number of research presentations by participants. Please note that space for the workshop is very limited. To apply, please send a brief description of your research in relevant areas (150-200 wds) and a brief CV (2 page max) to John.Tresch@sas.ac.uk and vollgraff@bilderfahrzeuge.org

Applications from London-area postgraduate students and early-career scholars working at the crossroads of art history, anthropology, geography, and/or the history of the human sciences are especially welcome.

Event: Seminar on “Museum Affordances: Activating West African Ethnographic Archives and Collections through Experimental Museology,” by Paul Basu, University of Oslo, 22 May, 2019

On May 22, 2019 Dr. Paul Basu will be delivering a talk entitled: “Museum Affordances: Activating West African Ethnographic Archives and Collections through Experimental Museology,” at the University of Oslo. Part of the Department of Social Anthropology’s annual seminar series, this event will take place from 2:15pm-4:00pm, at Blindern, Eilert Sundt’s house, in the Sixth floor meeting room. In this presentation, Dr. Basu will discuss his recent work in Nigeria, where he has been retracing the itineraries of the colonial anthropologist N. W. Thomas.

The seminar will be followed by an informal gathering, at which refreshments are served. More information about this event can be found here.

Event: Human Tissue Ethics in Anatomy, Past and Present: From Bodies to Tissues to Data, Harvard University, April 4, 2019

Anatomy as a science and as an educational discipline in the medical curriculum is forever in transition. One of the greatest areas of change in recent decades has been the systematic evaluation of ethical questions in anatomy. At the center of these deliberations is the status of the dead human body, which is no longer only seen as a mere “object” or “material” of research or as an educational “tool.” Rather, it is described as a body that still has connections with the person who once inhabited it, thus becoming part of a social network of knowledge gain and requiring respectful treatment.

This change of perspective will be explored in the symposium, “Human Tissue Ethics in Anatomy, Past and Present: From Bodies to Tissues to Data,” which will take place in Gordon Hall, Harvard Medical School Campus on April 4, 2019 from 9:00am to 3:00pm. At this event, an international group of scholars will discuss the ethical aspects of existing questions, explore the relevance of non-profit and for-profit body donation, and examine newly emerging technologies in anatomy that may need innovative ethical approaches. The aim of this symposium is to present evidence for the insight that transparent and ethical anatomical body and tissue procurement is indeed at the core of medical ethics in research and education.

The event’s program and registration information can be found here.

Event: Global Conversations: Cross-Fertilization of Knowledge in the Making of the Modern World, Berlin, 26-27 April 2019

Olga Linkiewicz (Tadeusz Manteuffel Institute of History, Polish Academy of Sciences), Katrin Steffen (Hamburg) and Axel Jansen (Washington, DC) have organized an exploratory workshop on “Global Conversations: Cross-Fertilization of Knowledge in the Making of the Modern World.” This event will take place at the Forum Transregionale Studien in Berlin, from April 26-27 2019.

The workshop aims to explore the history of knowledge exchange in the twentieth century. In particular, it focuses on channels of communication between Eastern Europe, Germany, and East and South Asia and examines the ways in which scholars used the notion of human character, social betterment, and social change to analyze the complex relationship between epistemology and stereotypes.

Questions about this event can be directed to Olga Linkiewicz at ola.linkiewicz@ihpan.edu.pl

New Opportunity: Call for a Section Editor on the History of Ethnography for the Handbook on the History of Human Sciences

David McCallum, emeritus professor at Victoria University’s Centre for International Research on Education Systems in Melbourne, Australia, and editor of the Handbook on the History of Human Sciences, is looking for a suitable person to edit the Handbook’s ethnography section. Interested persons can contact him ASAP at david.mccallum@vu.edu.au

CFP: “Museums Different,” Second Biennial Conference of the Council for Museum Anthropology, Santa Fe, New Mexico, September 19-21, 2019

The Council for Museum Anthropology (CMA) has issued a call for papers for its second biennial conference that will take place in Santa Fe, New Mexico from Thursday, September 19th through Saturday, September 21st, 2019. Using the unique position of Santa Fe—the “City Different”—as a starting point for thinking broadly about both local and global approaches to museum anthropology, the conference theme is “Museums Different.”

The conference will be held at Santa Fe’s Museum Hill, home to both the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture/Laboratory of Anthropology and the Museum of International Folk Art. The event includes sessions and activities at the Institute of American Indian Arts as well as an evening reception at the School for Advanced Research. More information on this event and the submission process can be found below.

Continue reading
Older posts