News (page 1 of 3)

The News section gathers announcements and current events relevant to anthropology and its history. To submit such news, please email us at news@histanthro.org.

Event: Coming of Age: The Sexual Awakening of Margaret Mead, American Philosophical Society, PA, 8 March 2018

In honor of the American Philosophical Society‘s 275th anniversary, the Society’s 2018 lecture series will feature talks inspired by the APS’s history and the work of its Members. Margaret Mead was elected to the Society in 1977.

On 8 March 2018 the APS will host a public event entitled: Coming of Age: The Sexual Awakening of Margaret Mead, which will engage author Deborah Blum in a discussion of her new book of the same title. A reception will be held at 5:30pm, and the lecture will take place at 6:00pm. All events will take place in Benjamin Franklin Hall, 427 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA.

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Fellowship: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI) Internship

The Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI) Undergraduate Summer Internship provides an opportunity for three talented undergraduates to conduct research, explore career possibilities in archives and special collections, and learn about advanced training in Native American and Indigenous Studies and related fields.

This eight-week paid internship program at the American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia will offer a hands-on research experience and will include mentorship and networking opportunities. The APS Library has rich and varied collections related to over 440 different Indigenous cultures throughout the Americas. Working with mentors, interns will develop their own archives-based projects or pursue research projects identified by the Indigenous communities, with which the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR) interacts and collaborates. More information about this opportunity as well as detailed application instructions can be found below:

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Event: No “mere accumulation of material”: Land as Evidence in Americanist Anthropology; 19 February, 2018, University of Pennsylvania, PA

On Monday, February 19, 2018  Julia Rodriguez (University of New Hampshire) will be presenting a paper as part of the University of Pennsylvania’s HSS Workshop series. The presentation, titled: “No mere accumulation of material’: Land as Evidence in Americanist Anthropology” will have a strong history of anthropology focus, and will look at the role that Latin America played in the origins of transnational Americanist anthropology. The workshop will take place at 3:00pm in Claudia Cohen Hall, Rm 337.

The full abstract of Dr. Rodriguez’s paper can be found below:

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CFP: Panel on Missionary Ethnographies, 18th IUAES World Congress, Florianopolis (Brasil), July 16 to 20, 2018

Ana Rita Amaral (University of Lisbon) and Richard Hölzl (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen) invite submissions for a panel on Missionary Ethnographies: Encounters, Uses and Legacies Between Science and Faith (OP 125) which will be presented at the 18th IUAES World Congress held in Florianopolis (Brasil) from July 16-20, 2018. They seek papers that examine missionary transgressions of the boundary of the religious and the secular, both in missionary ethnographic fieldwork and in missionary exhibitions, museums, collections, popular and scientific publications. The full panel abstract and details for submission are provided below:

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Fellowships: 2018-2019 Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI) Fellowships at the American Philosophical Society

The American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia, PA invites applications for predoctoral, postdoctoral, and short-term research fellowships from scholars at all stages of their careers, especially Native American scholars in training, tribal college and university faculty members, and other scholars working closely with Native communities on projects in Native American and Indigenous Studies and related fields and disciplines. These funding opportunities are supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI). Fellows will be associated with the APS’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR), which promotes greater collaboration among scholars, archives, and indigenous communities.

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Event: Tour of Smithsonian’s Department of Anthropology Archives and Ethnological Collection, Maryland, USA

This year, the American Historical Association is offering a behind-the-scenes tour of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History‘s Department of Anthropology collections and National Anthropological Archives (NAA) at the museum’s off-site storage site, the Museum Support Center, in Suitland, Maryland.  This tour will be held on Friday, Jan. 5th, from 2:30-4:30 pm, and is open to 20 participants.  Interested historians should RSVP to Caitlin Haynes, NAA Reference Archivist at haynesce@si.edu by Dec. 29, 2017 with your name and contact information to reserve your spot.

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CFP: Symposium on the History of Biological Anthropology and the Royal Anthropological Institute; 20 April 2018, London, England

The Royal Anthropological Institute (RAI) is pleased to announce that it will be holding a one day meeting to explore the history of biological anthropology and the RAI on 20 April 2018.

Dr. David Shankland, Director of the RAI & Dr. Simon Underdown, Oxford Brookes University, invite paper submissions that examine the history of biological anthropology or the changing relationship between bio- and social anthropology, focusing particularly on how these histories intersect with the RAI. They also welcome papers about the Institute’s publications, its Presidents, Fellows, or its projects from its foundation to the present. The full symposium abstract and details for submission are provided below:

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‘All the World Is Here’ Exhibition Review

All the World Is Here: Harvard’s Peabody Museum and the Invention of American Anthropology. A new exhibit (opened April 2017) at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard University, curated by Irene Castle McLaughlin, Ilisa Barbash, and Diana Loren.

In celebration of its 150th anniversary, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology at Harvard University has curated All the World Is Here: Harvard’s Peabody Museum and the Invention of American Anthropology. The exhibition boasts an impressive array of ethnographic artifacts, which range from a Feejee mermaid to Hopi baskets to a bracelet from the Iron Age. Photographs, correspondence, and newspaper clippings set the historical contexts during which the artifacts were created, collected, and circulated. Together, these materials document the late-nineteenth-century ambitions behind the founding of the museum, while granting particular attention to the work of Frederic Ward Putnam, who served as the Peabody’s second director (1875-1909) and trained the first generation of ethnographers in the country, including Franz Boas. The exhibit argues that the Peabody Museum, as a hub for the aggregation of artifacts and intellectual engagement, provided an initial scaffolding for anthropology as an academic discipline in the United States.

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New Resource: The Malinowski Forum for Ethnography and Anthropology

The MFEA-The Malinowski Forum for Ethnography and Anthropology investigates the lives and works of Bronislaw Malinowski and his first wife, Elsie Masson, focusing on their presence in South Tyrol, Northern Italy, where the couple lived in the 1920s.

This project provides researchers with many resources related to Malinowski and Masson, such as a bibliography, and a set of links to the main archives and collections that contain manuscripts, papers, photos, letters and the objects that Malinowski brought with him from the Trobriand Islands .

The MFEA project is coordinated by Prof. Dorothy Zinn and Dr. Elisabeth Tauber at the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano.

More information can be found here.

Event: History of Anthropology Events at the AAA Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, November 29-December 3, 2017

The annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association will take place November 29-December 3 at the Marriott Wardman Park Hotel in Washington, DC. Here is a list of sessions and events relevant to the history of anthropology.

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Event: History of Anthropology Events at the History of Science Society Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada, Nov 9-12, 2017

The annual meeting of the History of Science Society (HSS) will take place November 9-12 at the Sheraton Centre in downtown Toronto, ON. Here is a list of sessions and events relevant to the history of anthropology:

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Event: HAN 2017 Lecture by Alice Conklin

In celebration of the second anniversary of the online relaunch of the Newsletter, HAN will be hosting a public lecture by Professor Alice Conklin (Ohio State University). Her lecture, “‘Nothing is Less Universal than the Idea of Race’: Anti-Racism and Social Science at UNESCO, 1950-1962,” will be held on Monday, October 30 from 3:30-5:00pm as part of the Department of History and Sociology of Science workshop series and will take place in Room 337, Claudia Cohen Hall, University of Pennsylvania. See poster for abstract and additional details.

Editors’ Introduction: Fields, Furrows, and Landmarks in the History of Anthropology

In 1973, the first issue of the History of Anthropology Newsletter opened with a statement of purpose from the editorial committee, called “Prospects and Problems,” by George Stocking. The editors were self-consciously defining and claiming a field. They let loose with territorial metaphors: occupation, soil, furrows, forays. Now, as we continue our relaunch of HAN, we return to this 40-year-old manifesto as a starting point for thinking about the past, present, and future of the field.

The 1973 essay noted a sense of disciplinary crisis as a spur to growth; it asked whether this history should be done by anthropologists, intellectual historians on “one-book forays,” by “anthropologists manqué,” or by a new generation of interdisciplinarians; it announced the need for “landmarks” including lists of archival holdings, bibliographic aids, research in progress, recent publications—which HAN would provide. It ended with a call for participation from readers.

Seeking to continue HAN’s role as a site for debating the field’s present state and shaping its future, in late 2016 we invited a series of scholars from various fields to respond to this manifesto. In February 2017, eight distinguished authors responded with generosity, insight, experience, good humor—and impressive speed. Continuing our reappraisal of Stocking’s inaugural editorial statement, in August 2017 we added nine additional surveys of the field’s potential terrain. These contributions covered new ground, unearthed skepticisms, and sowed a set of new questions. Now, in October 2017, we close the series with a third set of reflections from an impressive group of early career scholars. They imply a rich future for the study of anthropology’s past.

We encourage HAN readers and subscribers to make use of the comments section to respond to individual pieces, or to the section as a whole. Dig in and leave a mark.

 

This editorial was originally published on February 1, 2017. It was updated on August 15, 2017 and on October 21, 2017.

 

Job Opportunity: Department of European Ethnology at the Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich

The Department of European Ethnology at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich have released three postings for postdoctoral/doctoral positions allocated to the research project ‘Social Sketches and the Formation of Ethnographic and Sociological Knowledge (1830-1860)’, a research group funded by the German Research Foundation which investigates early sociographic journalism (“social sketches”) in relation to the formation of sociological, ethnological, and ethnographic knowledge. More information on each of these positions can be found below:

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CFP: Panel on “Resurgent Racism: Perspectives from History and Anthropology,” ICA 2018

Julia Rodriguez (University of New Hampshire) and Carmen Martínez-Novo (University of Kentucky and FLACSO) invite submissions for a, panel on “Resurgent Racism: Perspectives from History and Anthropology” (01/51) which will be presented at the 56th International Congress of Americanists (ICA), an interdisciplinary conference that gathers together researchers who study the American continent from the analysis of politics, economy, culture, languages, history and prehistory. They seek papers that will recognize and document the continuities in racialized thought and practice, processes of cultural erasure, and the various forms of resistance and challenges to racial schema, segregation, marginalization, erasure, and violence across time and space. The full panel abstract and details for submission are provided below:

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Event: History of Anthropology Workshop in Berlin, October 5, 2017

For the 12th time, a history of anthropology workshop will be convened in the framework of the German Anthropological Association (Deutsche Gesellschaft für VölkerkundeDGV), to take place at the Free University of Berlin on October 5, 2017. The workshop is convened by the DGV- Working Group “History of Anthropology” around the central theme “From the History of Anthropology to its Future: Historical, Moral, and Political Affinities.”

The conference will include  eight papers and a keynote address by Bernhard Streck, Professor Emeritus of the University of Leipzig.

Program titles and abstracts can be found here under “Workshop 17.”

Event: International Bérose ANR VISA Conference “1950’s : On the roots of French Contemporary Anthropology,” October 17-19 2017, Paris: EHESS and Musée de l’Homme

The International Bérose ANR VISA Conference “1950’s : On the roots of French Contemporary Anthropology,” will take place from October 17-19 at the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and Musée de l’Homme in Paris, France.

This conference will examine the history of French contemporary anthropology, focusing particularly on the postwar period. These years were promising and polyphonic, as they marked the beginning of a dynamic field, and the introduction of a variety of theoretical and ethnographic points of view. This colloquium will map the forces in action that created this environment, identify certain important players, identify new objects of study, view this history in the context of the colonial wars and the decolonization process, and discuss how ideas circulated across borders.

A complete schedule of the conference can be found on the event website.

‘Collecting Mesoamerica’ Exhibition Review

Collecting Mesoamerica: The Hemispheric Roots of U.S. Anthropology. A recent exhibit (May 8 – July 7, 2017) at the Kislak Center, University of Pennsylvania Libraries, curated by Lindsay Van Tine.

Editor’s Note: Due to the participatory nature of museum exhibits, the HAN Editors have chosen to publish this piece both as a “Review” and as part of its “Participant Observation” series. The Editors welcome and encourage future multi-purpose submissions in the form of reviews, reports, or other reflections on interactive projects and exhibits related to the history of anthropology.

The name of Daniel Garrison Brinton is not one that is on the tip of the tongue for many anthropologists specializing in studies of Mesoamerican cultures, languages, and history. Nevertheless, in a recent exhibition at the University of Pennsylvania’s Kislak Center for Special Collections, Collecting Mesoamerica: The Hemispheric Roots of U.S. Anthropology, curator Lindsay Van Tine elucidates how Brinton—a prolific late nineteenth century “armchair anthropologist” par excellence—played a considerable role in defining what we now know as “Mesoamerica,” both as a bounded geographic space and as a field of scholarly specialization. As such, Van Tine’s exhibit contributes to an archaeology of the discipline in a Foucauldian sense of the term, exposing some of the deep and at times forgotten roots of Mesoamerican studies. The exhibit also contributes to an archaeology of the discipline in a somewhat literal sense. To curate the exhibit, Van Tine sifted through and uncovered objects and documents that had long been dispersed in a number of different archives at the University of Pennsylvania in an effort to reconstruct Brinton’s collection of Mesoamerican materials as it was constituted at the end of the nineteenth century.

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New Resource: BEROSE-Online Encyclopaedia on the History of Anthropology and Ethnography

BEROSE is an online encyclopaedia dedicated to the history of anthropology in the broadest sense, including ethnography, ethnology, folklore studies and related disciplines. The freely accessible repository rests on three cornerstones, which are constantly being expanded: topical dossiers, an original collection of e-books (Carnets de Bérose), and scientific meetings related to the research programme. The dossiers cover: the lives and work of anthropologists and ethnographers; the development of anthropological and ethnographic journals; the history of anthropological institutions, broadly defined.

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Event: “The History of Anthropology and Ethnology in Spain and the Hispanic American World,” XIV Congress of the FAAEE, Valencia, Spain, September 6

XIV Congress of the Spanish Federation of Anthropology Associations (FAAEE), Valencia, Spain

“The History of Anthropology and Ethnology in Spain and the Hispanic American World”

Where: Conference Hall, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Valencia

When: Wednesday, September the 6th, 11:00 to 12:30

The purpose of this reunion is to bring together in an open academic meeting scholars and researchers working in the field of the history of Spanish anthropology and ethnology. One explicit aim is to explore the feasibility of setting up a history of anthropology network in the framework of the Spanish Federation of Anthropology Associations (FAAEE). Four scholars have been invited to present and speak about current or past research carried out in the field, followed by commentaries from two discussants and an open debate with all participants in the room.

A complete  schedule of this meeting be found on the event website.

Cosmologies of Becoming: A review of “Knowledges in Contact”: 6th Annual Natura Conference on Science and Epistemology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, March 31, 2017

This year’s conference on science and epistemology was organized by Natura, an interdisciplinary research group at Rutgers. It was themed Knowledges in Contact, and drew on a variety of issues pertaining to the history of anthropology, science, and, more broadly, knowledge. The central theme of the conference focused on the historical and ethical issues in understanding epistemology, and was explored through a range of interdisciplinary papers. In simple terms, the papers examined the processes through which diverse scientific ‘knowledges’ come into being. In the following reflections of the presented papers, I identify some theoretical points of interest to the history of anthropology, including themes relating to ‘contact’, ‘encounters’, ‘agency’, ‘representation’, ‘gaze’, ‘voice’ and ‘authority.’ Continue reading

Web Roundup 8/5–8/18

This week, we’re presenting the second installment of our biweekly roundup! For this HAN feature, we are compiling lists of new, interesting pieces on the history of anthropology our editors have been reading around the web. This installment spans August 5 – August 18.

Event: University of Cambridge’s “Histories of Anthropology” Conference

The “Histories of Anthropology:  Transforming Knowledge and Power (1870-1970)” conference will be held on the 18th and 19th of September 2017 at Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge.  The conference will examine the history of anthropology in terms of two broadly conceived themes. The first concerns the history of anthropology’s relationship with cognate disciplines. The second explores the political and social history of anthropology, its relationship to governance, colonialism and broader political and social transformations. Registration information and a complete schedule of the conference can be found on the event website.

Web Roundup 7/21–8/4

Welcome to our biweekly roundup! For this new HAN feature, we’re compiling lists of new, interesting pieces on the history of anthropology our editors have been reading around the web. This installment spans July 21 – August 4.

 

Diversity at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA)

Biological anthropology has long been plagued by its exclusionary past. Today, many biological anthropologists and the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) are actively seeking to address this legacy by forging positive relationships between anthropologists and marginalized communities, and by encouraging new voices to contribute to the field. For example, the AAPA created the Increasing Diversity in Evolutionary Anthropological Sciences (IDEAS) program to increase participation by first-generation college students or students from groups that are traditionally underrepresented in science (African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, and Latinos). The recent Survey of Academic Field Experiences (SAFE) study (2014) conducted by Kate Clancy, Robin Nelson, Julienne Rutherford, and Katie Hinde also highlighted persistent issues of sexual harassment and sexual assault in the field.

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