Jennifer Fraser (page 1 of 5)

CFP: Anthropological Journal of European Cultures Special Issue on “Decolonizing Europe: national and transnational projects”

The Anthropological Journal of European Cultures is inviting expressions of interest for a special themed issue on ‘Decolonizing Europe: national and transnational projects’ that will be edited by Patrícia Ferraz de Matos (Universidade de Lisboa) and Livio Sansone (Universidade Federal da Bahia) and published in the Fall 2021.

Pieces should be no longer than 3000 words (including references). Editors particularly welcome contributions from early career scholars and postgraduates–although they welcome submissions from established scholars too.

Interested contributors should submit a brief expression of interest outlining the proposed chapter (circa 300 words) to Patrícia Ferraz de Matos (patricia_matos@ics.ulisboa.pt) and Livio Sansone (sansone@ufba.br) by 5 March 2021.

More information on the thematic focus of this special issue is provided below.

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CFP: Préhistoire et anthropologie entre science, philosophie, politique et internationalisme. Colloque international sur Gabriel de Mortillet, Paris

On the occasion of the bicentennial of the prehistorian Gabriel de Mortillet’s (1821-1898) birth, the Musée d’archéologie nationale and the French research centres “Natural History of Prehistoric Man” and “Archaeology and Philology of the East and the West” are organizing an international conference entitled: Préhistoire et anthropologie entre science, philosophie, politique et internationalisme. À propos de Gabriel de Mortillet (Prehistory and anthropology between science, philosophy, politics and internationalism. About Gabriel de Mortillet).

The conference will be held in Paris (École Normale Supérieure) and Saint-Germain-en-Laye (Musée d’archéologie nationale) on 25-26 November 2021.

Organizers are currently accepting submissions for this event’s three thematic sessions:

  1. Penser et faire l’anthropologie et l’archéologie préhistorique au XIXe siècle
  2. Les archives du sol et les archives documentaires : un regard croisé et multidisciplinaire
  3. Gabriel de Mortillet préhistorien et voyageur scientifique sans frontières

Interested speakers are invited to submit their proposals online (via the registration section). The deadline for submissions is February 28, 2021.

More information about this event can be found here.

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CFP: Антропологии/ Anthropologies Special Issue on the History of European Anthropologies

The Russian open access journal Антропологии/Anthropologies, published by the Institute of Ethnology and Anthropology (Russian Academy of Sciences), is currently seeking contributions for a special issue on the histories of anthropology in Europe.

The aim of the issue is to provide the journal’s (mainly) Russian speaking readership with an idea of the current state of the field of history of anthropology in Europe or as practiced by European scholars. Editors are interested in research articles that exemplify current practices of writing the history of anthropology. Contributions that reflect on purposes and trends in this field are also welcome. Submissions do not need to be fully original research articles. Rather, they might present versions of already published research or works that are expected to be published in languages other than Russian.

Articles should be approximately 9,000 words. Submissions can be written in English, German, Italian, Spanish, and French, and will be accepted until 15 March 2021.

Original English texts will be published in both English and Russian versions of the journal.

More information about the journal and the submission process can be found here.

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Online Seminar: Anthropology After Gluckman, January 21, 2021

On 21 January 2021, from 5:00-6:30pm, the African Studies Centre at the University of Oxford is hosting a special panel discussion on Richard Werbner’s book: Anthropology After Gluckman: The Manchester School, Colonial and Postcolonial Transformations (2020).

The panel features author Richard Werbner (University of
Manchester) in conversation with Marilyn Strathern (University of Cambridge), Adam Kuper, (Boston University), Richard Fardon (SOAS), and Sakkie Niehaus (Brunel University). The discussion will be moderated by Wale Adebanwi (University of Oxford).

The meeting can be joined by following this link.

RSVP: Brenda McCollum (brenda.mccollum@kellogg.ox.ac.uk)

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‘Science, Museums and Collecting the Indigenous Dead in Colonial Australia’ by Paul Turnbull

Paul Turnbull. Science, Museums and Collecting the Indigenous Dead in Colonial Australia. Palgrave Studies in Pacific History. 428 pp., 6 b/w illus., bibl., index. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.

Indigenous bodies have long been a source of historical interest. Over the past decade many scholars have discussed how indigenous bodies and body parts have functioned as sites of persistent fascination, colonial oppression, and Indigenous agency. One persistent theme in this historiography is how the collection and use of Indigenous biospecimens came to be prospected and profited upon. Warwick Anderson’s The Collectors of Lost Souls showed us how Fore brain samples served as a valuable biomedical commodity. Kim TallBear and Jenny Reardon illustrated the role of “Indigenous DNA” in generating scientific knowledge, accruing capital, and attaining professional prestige. Emma Kowal similarly drew our attention to the “ethical biovalue” afforded to Indigenous specimens through discussing how many drug targets and diagnostic tools have emerged out of the collection and use of Indigenous blood, saliva, surgically-removed diseased tissues, and urine.[1] Paul Turnbull’s Science, Museums and Collecting the Indigenous Dead in Colonial Australia follows in the footsteps of this well-known body of work. However, rather than focusing his attention on brains, blood, or bodily tissues, Turnbull is more interested in Indigenous skeletal remains and the ways that they have functioned as sites of scientific curiosity from the 1700s to the turn of the twentieth century.

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Webinar: “Anthropology of Policing Part II: The Persistence of Racialized Police Brutality and Community Responses,” June 25, 2020

The American Anthropological Association is continuing the conversation on the Anthropology of Policing by offering a second webinar on the persistence of racialized police brutality and community responses. The webinar will take place on June 25, 2020 at 1pm EDT.

This event is free and open to the public. Registration information and instructions on how to access this event can be found here

New release from BEROSE – Hourcade on Georg Forster

HAR is pleased to announce the latest release from BEROSE International Encyclopaedia of the Histories of Anthropology. This new article by Emmanuel Hourcade traces the life of Georg Forster, the famous German traveler and ethnographer who, in 1772, accompanied Captain James Cook on his second voyage.

Hourcade, Emmanuel, 2020. “Anthropologie et rencontre des cultures au XVIIIe siècle: vie et œuvre de Georg Forster,” in BEROSE – International Encyclopaedia of the Histories of Anthropology, Paris.

In addition to unveiling the richness, vividness and sophistication of the ethnographic reports and reflections contained in Forster’s travelogue, A Voyage Round the World (1777), this piece also discusses the travelogue’s popular reception, and explains how Forster came to be recognized as a founding father of German scientific literature

Online Event: American Anthropology Association Webinar on the “Anthropology of Policing,” June 11, 2020

On June 11, 2020 at 1pm EDT/11am PDT the American Anthropology Association is hosting a webinar titled: “Anthropology of Policing: The Persistence of Racialized Police Brutality and Community Responses – What Can Anthropologists Contribute?

Featuring a variety of panelists, including Ramona Perez, Kalfani Ture, Donna Auston, Shanti Parikh, and Avram Bornstein, discussions will be guided by two principle questions: (1) What should an Anthropology of policing look like and (2) What practical and actionable steps should anthropologists, as cultural experts of the lived experiences of impacted communities, take to transform American policing.

This webinar is FREE and open to the public. Instructions for how to access this event can be found here. The full event abstract is provided below.

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Online Event: “Seeing Indigenous Land Struggles in COVID-19,” June 9, 2020

On June 9, 2020 the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship & Globalisation and the Science and Society Network is hosting an online workshop titled “Seeing Indigenous Land Struggles in COVID-19.”

Drawing on examples from the Philippines and Malaysia, this event will explore how indigenous struggles for land and livelihood are central to understanding the emergence of a zoonotic pathogen like SARS-CoV-2.

The seminar will be available to stream on YouTube live on June 9, 2020 from 10am – 11:30am (Australian Eastern Standard Time, GMT+10). Registration information can be found here.

More information about this event can be found below.

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Call for Applications: Honorary Reviews Editor for JRAI

The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute (JRAI) seeks to appoint an Honorary Reviews Editor to start shadowing the current Reviews Editor (Dr Dolores Martinez) from September 2020, and taking over from April 2021.

He or she will work closely with the Editors of the JRAI (The incoming editorial team includes Dr Tom Yarrow, Dr Hannah Knox, Dr Adam Reed, and Dr. Chika Watanabe, who will take over the editorship from September 2020).

The deadline to apply fo this position is July 30, 2020. More information about this opportunity can be found below.

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Call for Exhibition Submissions: “Illustrating Anthropology,” Royal Anthropological Institute, London, UK

The Royal Anthropological Institute is currently accepting submissions for an online and physical exhibition on “Illustrating Anthropology,” which explores the potential of illustration for anthropological research and dissemination.

If you’re looking for a creative way to engage with your research data during lockdown, or have sketches that express your ethnographic findings or experience, feel free to send them their way!

The deadline for submissions is May 22, 2019. More information about the exhibition, as well as detailed submission instructions can be found below.

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New Resource: Free Journal Access from Berghahn Books

In response to COVID-19, which has resulted in the closure of many universities and university libraries, Berghahn Books is providing researchers with free access to their entire journal archive up until June 30 2020.

Of special interest to historians of anthropology are:

Berghahn Books is an independent scholarly publisher in the humanities and social sciences. A comprehensive list of their journals can be found here.

New Resource: Ricardo A. Fagoaga’s “Primeras etnografías en México: su método, su olvido y la construcción de una idea la antropología mexicana.”

The History of Anthropology Review (HAR) is pleased to announce the recent publication of Ricardo A. Fagoaga‘s book chapter: “Primeras etnografías en México: su método, su olvido y la construcción de una idea la antropología mexicana.”

In this chapter, Fagoaga explores the history of the Huasteca expedition, an ethnographic fieldwork project carried out by María Atienza, Isabel Gamboa and Luz Islas during the early twentieth century. A short description of the chapter, along with its citation information, can be found below:

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Funding Opportunity: Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI) Internship at the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum

The Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI) Undergraduate Summer Internship offered by the American Philosophical Society Library & Museum in Philadelphia provides an opportunity for three talented undergraduates to conduct research, to explore career possibilities in archives and special collections, and to learn about advanced training in Native American and Indigenous Studies and related fields.

The internship will take place in the summer of 2020, and interns will receive a stipend of between $3,000-$3,500 depending on housing costs. The deadline for applications is Friday, February 14, 2020. Further information about the internship and application process can be found below:

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New Resource: New articles on History of Anthropology in Middle America, Latin America and Mexico

The History of Anthropology Review (HAR) is happy to announce the recent publication of three articles on history of anthropology and
anthropological research in Middle America, Latin America and Mexico.

  • Stefan Krotz, “Zur Forschungsgeschichte in Mesoamerika,” in Eveline Dürr y Henry Kammler, Hrsg., eds., Einführung in die Ethnologie Mesoamerikas. Ein Handbuch zu den indigenen Kulturen (Waxmann Verlag, 2018), 127-13.
  • Stefan Krotz, “Overseas, Continental, and Internal Colonialism: Responses from Latin American Anthropologies,” in Dittmar Schorkowitz, John R. Chávez and Ingo W. Schröder, eds., Shifting Forms of Continental Colonialism: Unfinished Struggles and Tensions (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019), 71-94.
  • Esteban Krotz, “Claves para una estilística de la antropología política de Brigitte Boehm,” Relaciones, vol. 40, no. 157 (2019): 113-122.

HAR welcomes announcement suggestions from readers. If you have a recent publication, or come across an event, resource or CFP of interest, please let us know by emailing us at news@historyofanthropology.org

New Resource: Patricia Ferraz de Matos’ “Racial and Social Prejudice in the Colonial Empire: Issues Raised by Miscegenation in Portugal (Late Nineteenth to Mid-Twentieth Centuries)”

The History of Anthropology Review (HAR) is happy to announce the recent publication of Patricia Ferraz de Matos‘ article: “Racial and Social Prejudice in the Colonial Empire: Issues Raised by Miscegenation in Portugal (Late Nineteenth to Mid-Twentieth Centuries).”

In this article, Ferraz de Matos examines the issue of miscegenation in Portugal, which is directly associated with the context of its colonial empire, from late nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. The analysis considers sources from both literary and scientific fields. Topics such as interracial marriage, degeneration and segregation as well as the changes brought about by the end of World War II and the social revolutions of the 1960s are also considered. 

The full-text version of this article can be found here.

Funding Opportunity: 2020-2021 Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI) Fellowship and Internship at the American Philosophical Society

The American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia invites applications for summer undergraduate internships and predoctoral, postdoctoral, and short-term research fellowships from scholars at all stages of their careers, especially Native American scholars in training, tribal college and university faculty members, and other scholars working closely with Native communities on projects in Native American and Indigenous Studies and related fields and disciplines. These funding opportunities are supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI). Fellows will be associated with the APS’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR), which promotes greater collaboration among scholars, archives, and Indigenous communities. More information about these opportunities can be found below:

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Event: History of Arctic Anthropology, Royal Anthropological Institute, London, 27-28 February, 2020

On February 27-28, 2020 the Royal Anthropological Institute in London is hosting a two-day conference on the History of Arctic Anthropology. Confirmed speakers include Kirsten Hastrup (Copenhagen), Tim Ingold (Aberdeen), Igor Krupnik (Smithsonian) and Peter Schweitzer (Vienna). There is no conference fee, but tickets must be booked in advance. To RSVP please go to https://arcticanthropology.eventbrite.co.uk

Call for Papers: Special Issue of the Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences on “Going public: Mobilizing, materializing, and performing social science history”

The Journal of the History of the Behavioural Sciences (JHBS) is currently soliciting paper submissions for a special issue on: “Going public: Mobilizing, materializing, and performing social science history.” More information about this opportunity can be found below.

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Event: Antropologías y Antropólogos entre España y México, 1939-2019 [Anthropologies and Anthropologists between Spain and Mexico, 1939-2019],” Casa de Vélazquez, Madrid, 18 December 2019

On December 18, 2019, Casa de Velázquez in Madrid, Spain is hosting a one-day conference on “Antropologías y Antropólogos entre España y México, 1939-2019 [Anthropologies and Anthropologists between Spain and Mexico, 1939-2019].” The full program (in Spanish) can be found below:

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Event: Histories of Archaeology Conference at The Australian National University in Canberra, 23–27 March 2020

On 23–27 March 2020 the ‘Collective Biography of Archaeology in the Pacific’ (CBAP) Australian Research Council Laureate Project, led by Professor Matthew Spriggs, will be hosting the Histories of Archaeology conference at The Australian National University in Canberra, airing new ideas on the history of archaeology worldwide.

Invited keynote speakers include Margarita Díaz-Andreu, Stephanie Moser, Oscar Moro-Abadia, Tim Murray, Lynette Russell and Nathan Schlanger. The conference concludes the CBAP Project and launches the CBAP linked international museum exhibitions under the title of Uncovering Pacific Pasts: Histories of Archaeology in Oceania, which will take place at approximately 40 museums and cultural institutions worldwide.

Themes for the conference include: History of archaeology, archaeological theory and method; Objects and archives: history of archaeology through collections research; History of archaeology in the Pacific and Australia; Women in archaeology and the archaeology of gender; and, Indigenous agency and individuals in the history of archaeology.

More information about this event can be found here.

CFP: “Evidence: The Use and Misuse of Data,” American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia, June 4-5, 2020

The American Philosophical Society (APS) has issued a call for papers for “Evidence: The Use and Misuse of Data,” a day-long symposium that explores the nature of evidence. This event will take place in Philadelphia from June 4-5, 2020. More detailed information and submission instructions can be found below:

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New Resource: Nicholas Barron’s “Assembling ‘Enduring Peoples,’ mediating recognition: Anthropology, the Pascua Yaqui Indians, and the co-construction of ideas and politics”

The History of Anthropology Review (HAR) is happy to announce the publication of HAR editor Dr. Nicholas Barron’s “Assembling ‘Enduring Peoples,’ mediating recognition: Anthropology, the Pascua Yaqui Indians, and the co-construction of ideas and politics.”

In this article, Barron explores the concurrent development of Edward Spicer’s theory of ‘enduring peoples’ and his political support for the federal recognition of the Pascua Yaqui Indians of Southern Arizona. By examining these two cases, Barron illustrates how dynamic conceptions of acculturation and indigeneity dissipate in the face of recognition and more politically expedient narratives.

The full text version of this article can be found here.

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AAA History of Anthropology Review Happy Hour, Friday, November 22 at 4:30pm

In the spirit of the American Anthropological Association’s Annual Meeting, the History of Anthropology Review (HAR) will be hosting an informal gathering at Mahony, an Irish pub located in the Vancouver Convention Centre on Friday, November 22 at 4:30pm. All are welcome to join for drinks, snacks and engaging conversation.

The happy hour will follow the 2:00-3:45pm panel on “Re-Presenting Historical Legacies: A Decolonial Reckoning with Anthropology’s Ruins”–featuring papers from HAR editors Nick Barron, Rosanna Dent, and Taylor Moore, chaired by Hilary Leathem, and with comments from HAR Advisory Board member Lee Baker.

History of Anthropology Sessions at the American Anthropological Association Meeting, Vancouver, CA, November 20-24, 2019

Heading to the AAAs? Here are some curated sessions and events of interest related to the history of anthropology!

Want us to include your session? Send us an email–We’d love to hear from you: news@histanthro.org.

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