2018 (page 2 of 2)

Event: No “mere accumulation of material”: Land as Evidence in Americanist Anthropology; 19 February, 2018, University of Pennsylvania, PA

On Monday, February 19, 2018  Julia Rodriguez (University of New Hampshire) will be presenting a paper as part of the University of Pennsylvania’s HSS Workshop series. The presentation, titled: “No mere accumulation of material’: Land as Evidence in Americanist Anthropology” will have a strong history of anthropology focus, and will look at the role that Latin America played in the origins of transnational Americanist anthropology. The workshop will take place at 3:00pm in Claudia Cohen Hall, Rm 337.

The full abstract of Dr. Rodriguez’s paper can be found below:

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CFP: Panel on Missionary Ethnographies, 18th IUAES World Congress, Florianopolis (Brasil), July 16 to 20, 2018

Ana Rita Amaral (University of Lisbon) and Richard Hölzl (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen) invite submissions for a panel on Missionary Ethnographies: Encounters, Uses and Legacies Between Science and Faith (OP 125) which will be presented at the 18th IUAES World Congress held in Florianopolis (Brasil) from July 16-20, 2018. They seek papers that examine missionary transgressions of the boundary of the religious and the secular, both in missionary ethnographic fieldwork and in missionary exhibitions, museums, collections, popular and scientific publications. The full panel abstract and details for submission are provided below:

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Fellowships: 2018-2019 Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI) Fellowships at the American Philosophical Society

The American Philosophical Society Library in Philadelphia, PA invites applications for predoctoral, postdoctoral, and short-term research fellowships from scholars at all stages of their careers, especially Native American scholars in training, tribal college and university faculty members, and other scholars working closely with Native communities on projects in Native American and Indigenous Studies and related fields and disciplines. These funding opportunities are supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Native American Scholars Initiative (NASI). Fellows will be associated with the APS’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research (CNAIR), which promotes greater collaboration among scholars, archives, and indigenous communities.

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‘Collecting, Ordering, Governing’ by Bennett et al.

Tony Bennett, Fiona Cameron, Nélia Dias, Ben Dibley, Rodney Harrison, Ira Jacknis, and Conal McCarthy. Collecting, Ordering, Governing: Anthropology, Museums, and Liberal Government. 360 pp., 46 illus., notes, refs., index. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017. $94.95 (cloth), $26.95 (paper)

Histories of museum anthropology often have been constrained by the particularities of the institutions in which anthropological and archaeological objects have been gathered and displayed. Furthermore, these institutional narratives have tended to neglect the broader political implications of curatorial practices. In Collecting, Ordering, Governing, seven scholars specializing in the history of anthropology and museum studies have begun to subvert these accounts through a thoughtfully-crafted book that relies as much on the careful application of theory as it does on recounting the histories of specific museums. Focusing on case studies of museum displays and collecting projects organized in settler-colonial states (the United States, Australia, New Zealand) and in former imperial powers (Great Britain and France), the authors highlight both the explicit and implicit connections between developments in museum anthropology and the establishment of government policies. Yet the authors are careful to note that the book is not meant to serve as a “comparative analysis” of anthropological museums as established in different national and/or regional political contexts; rather, it concentrates on using these cases to trace the complex networks of influence and authority that enabled transactions of particular things and ideas across both physical and conceptual spaces (2). By focusing on these processes of exchange during what is typically regarded as the height of anthropology’s “museum era” (Sturtevant 1969; Stocking 1985), the authors shift away from scholarship that positions the museum as the central organizing force in the collection of anthropological objects and data and instead look to a variety of sites and actors that supported the management of populations as well as the dissemination of scientific and cultural knowledge.

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Shining a Light on Archaeological Data Processing: The Termatrex Machine

Archivist Alex Pezzati of the Penn Museum was on the verge of discarding a “curious collection” in the fall of 2016, when I invited him to present at a workshop I was then co-organizing with other members of the Penn Humanities Forum. “Translation beyond the Human” was our chosen theme, and I was hoping he could divert us with anecdotes about the history of early computing in anthropology. Continue reading

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